Finance in the News – w/c 22.10.18

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Short summaries of articles we think you will find useful from some of the weekend’s broadsheets.

FINANCIAL TIMES

“Share incentive schemes: invest in your employer”
Employee share ownership groups are lobbying chancellor Philip Hammond to take steps in his Budget on October 29th to widen participation in existing share ownership schemes.
“Prepare for Philip Hammond’s ‘trick or treat’ Budget”
There will likely be no giveaways for the wealthy in this Budget, though we could see the launch of some consultations into areas where the wealthiest are currently well-rewarded.
“Name checks to begin on bank transfers from 2019”
UK banks will introduce name checks on bank transfers next summer in an effort to combat rising bank fraud.
“HMRC IHT income dips for the first time in a decade”
House price slowdown sees growth in estate values level off.
“UK investment trust discounts widen since Brexit vote”
Some analysts think now is a good time to buy back into the sector.

THE TIMES

“Why the chancellor has investments and homes in his sights”
With coffers already swollen from rising stamp duty, CGT and inheritance tax, the Times looks at the likelihood of more rises in the budget.
“Fall in borrowing is good news for Hammond before budget”
Government borrowing fell more than expected last month, further easing pressure on the chancellor ahead of the budget on the 29th.

THE TELEGRAPH

“Legal ruling opens door to new pensions death tax risk”
The pensions of savers in ill-health face the threat of inheritance tax after HM Revenue & Customs won a controversial appeal case.
“Investment or casino bet: how safe is peer-to-peer?”
Ongoing concerns over the level of risk and quality of some providers have prompted the City watchdog to implement new rules to ensure investors are not short-changed.

THE GUARDIAN / OBSERVER

“Pensions: could you claim part of a £19bn cash mountain?”
A new study last week estimated there are more than £19bn of lost and forgotten pension pots waiting to be reunited with their owners.
“Taxes on buy-to-let landlords have not pushed up rents, study shows”
Warnings by landlords that taxes on buy-to-let would cripple the property market, driving down supply and pushing up rents, have turned out to be unfounded.

INDEPENDENT

“Brexit: UK’s food supply could be hit by no-deal outcome”
A no-deal Brexit could lead traders to bypass the UK and sail directly from Ireland to continental Europe, affecting food supplies, experts have suggested.

MAIL

“Bumper year for income investors with the FTSE 100 set for 10% dividend growth”
Total dividend payout from FTSE 100 companies is expected to grow by 10.6% to £89.8bn, though just 10 stocks will pay out more than half the total.

Please note that, due to copyright, we are no longer able to include a direct link to the newspaper article.

Source: https://www.techlink.co.uk/

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