Finance in the News – w/c 01.06.20

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Short summaries of recent articles we think you will find useful from some of the UK’s broadsheets.

FINANCIAL TIMES

“Pandemic accelerates desire to pass down wealth”
Fear over potential tax rises leads to a rise in people gifting assets to family members.
“Two-fifths of UK home movers put property plans on ice”
Coronavirus crisis continues to affect transactions as restrictions are eased.
“Probate: tell us what you think”
FT Money asks for readers’ views on navigating the probate system.
“Successful investors learn from history”
The current crisis has accelerated existing investment trends.
“Neil Woodford, Mark Barnett and the case for active management”
The average UK active fund has outperformed over the long term.
“Coronavirus will have a long-term impact on work and retirement”
Demographic upheaval will be felt for years to come influencing size of future labour forces.

THE TIMES

“Have young people ever been worse prepared for a recession?”
Job and housing prospects for the under-30s are increasingly grim.
“Directors miss out on state handouts through crisis”
The chancellor’s aid packages exclude many business owners.
“The tricky question: when to sell”
The steady decline in the value of Mark Barnett’s Invesco Income and High Income funds before his sacking this month has once again left investors asking whether they should sell.

THE TELEGRAPH

“Why you shouldn’t buy dividend-paying stocks that have taken Government support”
Income investors should not be suckered into buying companies that have kept dividend payment, experts have warned.
“What does a financial planner actually do – and should you use one?”
Financial planning goes well beyond picking investment ideas and can save you from big tax bills.
“Coronavirus means women won’t earn as much as men for an extra 30 years”
Women are more likely to have lost or quit their job since lockdown and experts predict they may now not achieve pay parity for 90 years.

THE GUARDIAN / OBSERVER

“Local business – Will investing in our newfound sense of community bring returns?
Local firms offering high interest rates are selling a better way to rebuild the UK after Covid. But there are risks.
“Cash in the time of coronavirus.”
How to get in financial shape for the new normal. Guardian Money helps you put your finances in order while adapting to a new way of living.

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Source: https://www.techlink.co.uk/

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