Finance in the News – w/c 15.04.19

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Short summaries of articles we think you will find useful from some of the weekend’s broadsheets.

FINANCIAL TIMES

“UK productivity warning rings alarm bells”
Slowdown worse than in any other comparable country, new research shows.
“Divorcees face lower legal bills under law reform”
Introduction of no-fault divorce will reduce tension in many cases.
“How do you value the most precious thing you have — your time?”
An unfulfilling job can affect your spending decisions and cost you your financial wellbeing.
“Tax-efficient schemes enjoy second-highest year on record”
Some £731m was invested in venture capital trusts in the financial year 2018-19.
“Long-term investing, a necessity and a choice”
The long bull market and QE have led to a drastic change in thinking.
“HMRC accused of errors over disputed tax demands”
UK revenue authority withdraws 10 per cent of accelerated payment notices.

THE TIMES

“Buy‑to‑let crackdown fuels boom in holiday rentals”
As tax perks dry up, landlords — and lenders — are finding comfort in the rise of the staycation.
“Happy 75th birthday: the taxman’s brought you an extra charge”
A raft of tax charges applies to pensions when savers turn 75, and these can particularly penalise those who have not dipped into their retirement funds.
“How a Corbyn government could hit your portfolio”
If you are fearful of rising inflation, higher taxes and nationalisation the Times offers advice on the steps to take to protect your investments.

THE TELEGRAPH

“Record dividends will boost investment returns, despite Brexit deadlock”
FTSE companies paid out a total of £19.7bn in the first three months of the year, according to data provider Link Asset Services – a new record.
“When the analysts say buy, it’s time to sell”.
Why you shouldn’t listen to ‘expert’ stock tips.

THE GUARDIAN / OBSERVER

“Frozen state pensions: MPs call for vote on ‘cruel’ policy”
The government has lodged a statutory instrument (SI) tying the passing of vital increases in carers’ allowance to the freezing of some overseas pensions. This, rebel MPs say, makes it very difficult for those supportive of ending the “frozen pensions” policy to vote against it as they would have to block the SI as a whole, preventing rises to other benefits.
“Five ways to reduce financial anxiety”
The first step to tackling money problems is facing the facts – then you can create a budget and get help if you need it.

MAIL

“Property prices jump as home buyers and sellers become ‘bored of Brexit’ and return to the market, says Rightmove”
The average price of new-to-the-market properties increased by an average of £3,447 in April, equivalent to 1.1 per cent, making it the biggest month-on-month increase since March 2018.

Please note that, due to copyright, we are no longer able to include a direct link to the newspaper article.

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