Finance in the News – w/c 29.04.19

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Short summaries of articles we think you will find useful from some of the weekend’s broadsheets.

FINANCIAL TIMES

“Inside the UK’s debt crisis”
A typical day inside a PayPlan call centre reveals the problems encountered by millions.
“A royal investment strategy for British babies”
Don’t waste money on baby showers — invest in junior Isas for your child’s future.
“HMRC to bring in online complaints process for the first time”
Tax authority blames prioritisation on Brexit for delay.
“More people paying capital gains and inheritance taxes”
New buy-to-let rules behind latest surge in CGT.
“Rising rents boost buy-to-let property yields”
London landlords benefit from falling house prices.
“Are you a great investor — or is it just the market?”
Investors need to study their successes and failures to avoid the risk of hubris.

THE TIMES

“The hunt for the next big ker‑ching!”
It has become nearly impossible to back future tech stars while they’re still small — but one man has the inside track.
“Self-employed face old age of chaos and penury”
Most have nothing saved and changes to the tax rules stop them putting more money away.
“What the shift to green energy means for investors”
A good portion of the £141 billion spent on energy over the next decade will go on renewables, according to government predictions.

THE TELEGRAPH

“How to retire at 55 and live off your dividends”
Plans for the 25, 35 and 45 year-old.
“Our ambidextrous tax system is giving with one hand and taking with the other”
The taxman has taken his largest-ever chunk of our money, according to official figures released this week, with HM Revenue and Customs pocketing £622.8bn in 2018-19 – up from £594bn the year before. That’s a rise of 5%, or an extra £29bn of our money nibbled away at before we get our plates to the table.
“Families fear for their cash as more trust and will-writing firms collapse”
Families are fearing for the control of their homes and other assets after the collapse of a string of unregulated firms that promised to cut care home fees and inheritance tax via the use of trusts.

THE GUARDIAN / OBSERVER

“Eurozone economic confidence hits two-year low”
Eurozone economic sentiment has fallen for the 10th month in a row, highlighting the weakness of Europe’s recovery.
“Brexit will slow UK economy for rest of 2019, forecaster warns”
The slow-burn impact of Brexit on the British economy will be a drag on growth for the rest of 2019, blocking the Bank of England from raising interest rates, a leading economics forecaster has warned.

MAIL

“Are we heading for a new tech bubble?”
Investors bet £1billion AGAINST trio of unicorns racing for global glory.

Please note that, due to copyright, we are no longer able to include a direct link to the newspaper article.

Source: https://www.techlink.co.uk/

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