Finance in the News – w/c 31.08.20

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Short summaries of recent articles we think you will find useful from some of the UK’s broadsheets.

FINANCIAL TIMES

“John Kay: a lifetime in investment trusts”
The veteran economist sets out his compelling reasons for investing in the sector.
“Maturing Child Trust Funds set to hand 18-year-olds up to £70,000”
Tax-free investment accounts created by Gordon Brown start to mature next week.
“Are the markets going to miss Trump?”
A Biden presidency could curb the dominance of US tech stocks.
“UK banks told to offer mortgage support when payment holidays end”
Regulator says lenders must continue to help homeowners, such as extending repayment terms.
“More than 800,000 UK employees short-changed on pensions”
Agency workers and low paid among those at risk of exclusion from schemes, study finds.
“Pensions cash a temptation for silver job seekers”
If you’re made redundant in your fifties, should you dip into your retirement funds?

THE TIMES

“What the trust fund babies will really do when they get their thousands of pounds”
Many people worried that a windfall at 18 would lead to a generation of reckless teenagers. Katherine Denham finds the opposite.
“We should not celebrate child trust funds: they failed”
It was always a load of old nonsense that teenagers inheriting a child trust fund would suddenly blow all the cash.
“Now you must fix for seven years to buy your first home”
Virgin Money has unveiled a first-time buyer mortgage that locks borrowers in for at least seven years despite first-time buyers typically living in their first home for less than five years.

THE TELEGRAPH

“Should you invest in holiday lets in cities to ride the staycation wave?”
Short-term let investors in Edinburgh and London were hammered by the pandemic. As lockdown eases, are there signs of hope?
“Quarter of young people reliant on parents to fund house purchases”
Banks demanding larger deposits from first-time buyers pushing those without family help out of the market.
“Eight ways landlords can protect themselves from a recession”
Support schemes are ending and landlords are predicted to lose £5.7bn by 2024: here’s how to avoid the worst of the Covid-19 recession.

THE GUARDIAN / OBSERVER

“No internships, no entry-level work”
Under-25s fear Covid jobs squeeze.
“Keep your spending organised”
Top money tips for university students.

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